How to Protect Your Child’s Vision

Eyesight must be cared for along with other areas of the body. Vision problems can start at a very young age. As a parent, there are many things you can do to protect your child’s vision so they may enjoy a lifetime of good eyesight.

Teach Good Habits

Teach your child to have good habits surrounding their eyesight. Show them the proper distance to hold a book, which is 15 to 25 inches, according to experts. Of course, your child’s arm’s are shorter but don’t allow your child to hold books close up to their faces.

Look For Indicators of Poor Vision

Your young child may not be able to communicate that they have trouble seeing. They may also assume their vision is the same as other kids.’ Always be on the lookout for indicators of challenging vision. These include:

  • your child drops a lot of items
  • behavioral issues (stemming from frustration)
  • excessive tripping/falling
  • often complains that their head hurts
  • poor grades
  • excessive dislike of school

Install Adequate Lighting

Poor lighting causes eye strain. Although a child’s decorative lamps are cute, they may not be bright enough for bedtime reading. Opt for a minimum of 40 watts next to the bed. If your child enjoys reading or looking at picture books elsewhere, place reading lamps where needed.

Get Professional Screenings

Don’t wait until your child’s school has a vision screening day. By then it may be too late to correct problems. Arrange to have your child’s vision screened in a professional doctor’s office. Even if your child can’t yet read, their vision can be tested in other ways that are age-appropriate. The earlier any issues are detected, the better the prognosis.

Use Protective Sports Eyewear

If your child engages in any contact sports, make sure they wear protective eyewear. Contact injuries are common in childhood when motor skills are still developing. Eye trauma can permanently damage vision, yet it’s easily preventable with protective eyewear.

You can help protect your child’s vision until they’re old enough to do so themselves. Use these tips to give your child the best odds of a lifetime of good vision.

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